Weaving with Wine Program Sold Out!

The Society decided to brighten gloomy winter months by setting up a winter Weaving with Wine class.  We thought we would have a few intrepid folks join us in the evening for a little escape from the winter.  We couldn’t be more wrong.  Weaving with Wine was a sold-out hit!!  While our program is over for…

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Valentines Day Celebration

Fabulous Valentines Day Celebration: Saturday, February 11, for children 6 to 12. Admission is $12 for members and $15 for nonmembers.  Join us at the historic Conklin Barn where Valentines Day will be in full swing!  Find out why we celebrate Valentines Day, create beautiful and unique cards for your special valentine, have your face…

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Edward Lange Watercolor Conserved

The Huntington Historical Society received funding from the 2011 Conservation Treatment Program administered by the Greater Hudson Heritage Network (GHHN) located in Elmsford, NY.  The program “provides support for treatment procedures to aid in stabilizing and preserving objects in collections of museums, historical, and cultural organizations in New York State.” An Edward Lange watercolor in…

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Past School Break Programs: Native American Day

It was a delightful day. Twenty five youngsters and their parents spent an interesting afternoon exploring the history and culture of our Native Americans. They learned about their traditions, skills, food, clothing and got to view authentic artifacts from our collections. They made head bands (with feathers) made pots from clay, played games that our…

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Past Events: Tour the Italian Lakes and Greek Isles featuring a 7-Night Eastern Mediterranean Cruise

  Now is the time to start thinking about next year’s spectacular vacation.   The Huntington Historical Society is partnering With Collette Vacations to provide the vacation of a lifetime.  Come with us and explore the Magnificent historical sights and cultures of northern Italy and the stunning Greek Islands.   Experience the breathtaking scenery of…

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Town Historian Robert C. Hughes' Blog